Sale! design t-shirts skullz

T-shirts design never say never

069

11,9×17,9 format teespring
Photoshop Ai File and Psd
RGB color mode
Smart Object
100% Layered

More details

200000 Items

$9.00

More info

THE PREPROFESSIONAL MISSION If integral to the notion of being professionally educated
are deep and enduring knowledge of the discipline, design understanding in relation to the
work of other disciplines, and appropriate application of skills and knowledge in ever-shifting
contexts of practice, what meaningfully different missions can preprofessional programs
serve? Articulating these alternate missions is the challenge for design education and a
necessary step in full disclosure to prospective students who must choose among a myriad
of program types. Liberal arts degrees involve, by definition, broad exposure to the sciences,
social sciences, and humanities, with somewhat deeper experiences in a focused area of
study. Many college art and design programs offer concurrently the bachelor of arts and
bachelor of fine arts, often under the same disciplinary titles. The presence of the BA
encourages students to transfer from nondesign majors without losing credits toward
graduation and to experiment with an array of interests without committing wholly to a
focused career path. A recurring pattern in institutions with both the preprofessional BA and
professional BFA, however, is a “professional lite” approach to the BA curriculum; students
enroll in the same beginning studio classes as their professionally focused BFA counterparts,
but stop short of completing the fully scaffolded sequences of coursework. The underlying
assumption of this approach is that capping the preprofessional student’s design experience
after completion of beginning level 71 EGD2 01 08/29/05 1:02 PM Page 71 coursework
provides a general understanding of design issues. This might be the case if the typical
course sequence moved through content from general overarching concepts to specific
applications. However, this is rarely the way in which studiobased coursework is designed.
For example, the organizing principle of most sequences of typography courses places study
of the letterform and word in early classes and defers the design of typographic systems for
later, upper-level courses. As a result, students who take only one typography course miss
even the most cursory exposure to entire dimensions of typographic design. The same is
true for sequenced graphic design studios; beginning courses usually focus on organizing
visual form and ignore the full range of issues implicit in design problems. In freestanding BA
programs, curricula frequently integrate typographic issues into general graphic design
offerings; students never engage in discussions or assignments that illustrate, for example,
the explicit ways in which written language and typographic form structure the interpretive
task. What is needed is the development of liberal arts curricula that distill the overarching
concepts of the discipline and provide instruction that asks students to reflect on these
concepts in deeper ways, recognizing that the opportunity to understand them through
professional studio practice will be limited. This calls for a different course structure and
pedagogy than we find in the typical professional program. Faculty must ask what truly
constitutes a liberal education in design and invent challenging but realistic missions for
preprofessional curricula. Further, curriculum and advising can direct students to
combinations of design and general education coursework that address emerging and less
traditional needs in design practice. For example, students with strong backgrounds in the
social sciences and design offer interesting skill sets for the emerging research practices in
the field; anthropology, psychology, and cultural studies provide much-needed perspectives
on audiences and contexts for design.
are deep and enduring knowledge of the discipline, design understanding in relation to the
work of other disciplines, and appropriate application of skills and knowledge in ever-shifting
contexts of practice, what meaningfully different missions can preprofessional programs
serve? Articulating these alternate missions is the challenge for design education and a
necessary step in full disclosure to prospective students who must choose among a myriad
of program types. Liberal arts degrees involve, by definition, broad exposure to the sciences,
social sciences, and humanities, with somewhat deeper experiences in a focused area of
study. Many college art and design programs offer concurrently the bachelor of arts and
bachelor of fine arts, often under the same disciplinary titles. The presence of the BA
encourages students to transfer from nondesign majors without losing credits toward
graduation and to experiment with an array of interests without committing wholly to a
focused career path. A recurring pattern in institutions with both the preprofessional BA and
professional BFA, however, is a “professional lite” approach to the BA curriculum; students
enroll in the same beginning studio classes as their professionally focused BFA counterparts,
but stop short of completing the fully scaffolded sequences of coursework. The underlying assumption of this approach is that capping the preprofessional student’s design experience after completion of beginning level 71 EGD2 01 08/29/05 1:02 PM Page 71 coursework provides a general understanding of design issues. This might be the case if the typical course sequence moved through content from general overarching concepts to specific applications. However, this is rarely the way in which studiobased coursework is designed. For example, the organizing principle of most sequences
of typography courses places study of the letterform and word in early classes and defers the
design of typographic systems for later, upper-level courses. As a result, students who take
only one typography course miss even the most cursory exposure to entire dimensions of
typographic design. The same is true for sequenced graphic design studios; beginning
courses usually focus on organizing visual form and ignore the full range of issues implicit in
design problems. In freestanding BA programs, curricula frequently integrate typographic
issues into general graphic design offerings; students never engage in discussions or
assignments that illustrate, for example, the explicit ways in which written language and
typographic form structure the interpretive task. What is needed is the development of
liberal arts curricula that distill the overarching concepts of the discipline and provide
instruction that asks students to reflect on these concepts in deeper ways, recognizing that
the opportunity to understand them through professional studio practice will be limited. This
calls for a different course structure and pedagogy than we find in the typical professional
program. Faculty must ask what truly constitutes a liberal education in design and invent
challenging but realistic missions for preprofessional curricula. Further, curriculum and
advising can direct students to combinations of design and general education coursework
that address emerging and less traditional needs in design practice. For example, students
with strong backgrounds in the social sciences and design offer interesting skill sets for the
emerging research practices in the field; anthropology, psychology, and cultural studies
provide much-needed perspectives on audiences and contexts for design.