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2004

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RGB color mode
Smart Object
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Keep Your Design Simple: design
Limit your variation of color, font, and line spacing. If your message format is
important (and includes headings, bulleted and numbered lists, or tables), consider
sending your document as an attachment, but don’t assume that it will
transmit assent. First, check that your recipient has adequate hardware and
compatible software to view and save the attachment.design
Realize Attachments Are Not Foolproof
Avoid sending memory-hungry attachments that bog down your recipient’s
computer, unless you have checked in advance on its speed and capability.
MEMOS
When you write a message to others within your agency or organization, you are
likely to use a memo (short for memorandum) format. Memos are used often
and regularly for internal communications, such as progress reports, policy
announcements, and project management.design
Although memos are traditionally internal documents (used within agencies),
we’ve noticed that among graphic designers, the memo format is used for
some external communications as well. For example, the sample memo on page
31 was sent by Don Riggle to a potential client. It underscored a casual approach
that meshed with the client’s style.design
If you are writing to more formal and traditional clients, Fortune 500 or
international companies, for instance, you should use a business letter format to
match your reader’s preferred style and tone.design
A memo has fewer parts than a business letter and is often less than a page
in length. Note that there is no salutation or complimentary close in a memo. Its
design is fairly standard in that it begins with a modified company letterhead or
logo, followed by the parts of a memo, which are all flush to the left margin.
Also aligned against the left margin are the standard headings: TO, FROM,
DATE, and SUBJECT. You sign or initial your memo by your name on the
FROM line.design
Required Parts of a Memo
Always include the following information in a memo.
The “TO” Line. Type your reader’s name and, when appropriate, a title (TO:
Randa Gold, Production Editor). Sometimes, you might include several names
on this line (TO Carlos Gonzalez, Jan Tobin, and Melinda Speros). Instead of
addressing a list of names, you might simply write to a committee or project
team (TO The Allendale Project Team).design
The “FROM” Line. Type your name and, when appropriate, your title. The only
the way you sign a memo is by handwriting your signature (or initials) next to your
name in ink.design